Three fears you need to resist

Yes, it feels safe.  Yes, it's the easier.  Yes, I'm well aware how comfortable you are.  These are the benefits to staying inside the box.  Living in the box is like living in a furnished emotional bunker.  Looks friendly, right?

But occasionally we get pushed out of the box.  Like yesterday, when I was running an errand and I heard a sound from my car I immediately knew wasn't good.  A plastic guard had come lose under my car and was rubbing against one of my rear tires as I drove.  The guard was getting eaten by the tire and I was worried about possible damage to the tire.

What happened? A single bolt had come lose.

The problem: I don't carry spare bolts.

So thus I sat outside my car in a parking lot thinking how I could solve the problem and make it home for better repairs.  I needed something.  Something that could be strung through the hole of the missing bolt or something to clamp the guard in place.  So I sat on the payment and thought.

Then it came it to me.  My guitar was in the back of my car.  And what does every guitar player keep in their case?

A clamp.

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Okay, so it's a capo.  The point is...it was perfect for the job.

I made it back home to find a bolt.  Look what held the job together across five miles and speeds as high as 70 miles per hour!

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Systems will wear out on the team or organization we lead.  Do you have what it takes to do something new to get to a better place?

You can't let fear control you.  Here are the fears I faced solving a small glitch in the system:

1.  My limits - When I first sat on the pavement to look under the car I thought, "Whelp, I'm screwed."  There was damage already being done and I couldn't see past the problem because I have no clue about cars.  So of course I experienced the emotions of my own limits first.

2.  The wrong tools - I'm not one of those guys who caries a crossbow, a shotgun, a toolkit, and a parka in the back of his car. (I'll be the first to go in a zombie apocalypse)  I was ill-prepared and I didn't have the right tools.  However, the right tool to get things moving was in the car.  It wouldn't be used for it's original purpose but it was exactly what I needed to get things moving again.  Leaders, take note.  More than likely either the right person or the right tool is already with you.  You just haven't thought creatively enough how to use them.

3.  The cost - If the capo came lose during my trip back home it's going to cost me $18 for the capo not to mention more damage to the guard and possibly the tire.  The other option was for my life to stop moving and just stay put.  I see leaders who make the decision not to move, it's safer right here.  "It's too costly to change this system."  Let's say I declared myself stranded and refused to move.  Eventually, I would have no job or any relationship for that matter.  So how can we use cost of change as an excuse to not move our team or organization forward?

So today I ask you, what's it going to take to get you out of the box?  Stop letting fear control you.  Just sit down, think about what you already have, and get creative.